A Letter from an Intergenerational Group of Black Community Workers

Note: C-Uni-T is happy to host the letter below on our website. The letter is not a C-Uni-T initiative, rather, it was initiated by the seven women who have co-authored and signed it.

N.B. C-Uni-T a le plaisir d’héberger la lettre ci-dessous sur son site. Cette lettre n’est pas une initiative du collectif mais plutôt le travail de sept femmes qui ont co-écrit et signé cette lettre. Version française ci-dessous.

____________________________________________________________________

A Letter from an Intergenerational group of Black Community Workers

Coming from different walks of life, ages, origins, professions and occupations, in Montreal we have come to know each other while in the trenches, through our work and actions for our various communities. Following the highly problematic article recently published in the Gazette that asked if Black lives matter in Montreal, we are writing to call attention to the diversity of Black experiences and of Black activism in the city. We recognize that activism, as a form of politics, happens in many ways, sometimes outside of the view of the mainstream media and public. We know that community members cope with oppression and express ourselves in many different ways and sometimes only in private. By claiming that Black activism in this city is weak, fearful or gone because our community does not mimic particular African American styles of organizing and activism that rely on easily identifiable, charismatic individuals and direct action campaigns, a journalist can erase the everyday smaller actions that Black people are doing within and outside of community organizations.

Using a social movement from the United States as a measuring tool for our local activism, is an attempt to ignore the historical and political context in which black communities have been organizing here for centuries. In particular, it minimizes the bridges we have managed to build, tend, and maintain despite the great divide caused by the linguistic canyon that tends to divide people into grand solitudes. It also ignores the different types of activist work that Black people in Québec have been and are involved in as artists, students, educators, writers and other cultural and community workers.

While we fully support the Black Lives Matter movement in the United States, using it as an ideal with which to compare all Black activism reinforces notions of a hierarchy of Black communities throughout the Americas, a hierarchy that we do not adhere to. Protests and press conferences are important strategies of social-political activism, however, it is also the long-term, day to day work of those who support, serve and build the capacity of our communities over time that forms the foundation and determines the success of any movement for change. We have a fond respect for the work of African American activists our local goals are far from different than theirs. But in addition to the United States, our work is informed and can be rooted in many other countries and communities with whom we connect on a profound and ongoing basis. We do not think ranking comparisons between spaces, types of work, activism, and communities is fruitful.

We also understand that community work as activism can rely on shared leadership, where no one becomes the reference, face or voice of a movement, organization or a collective. We make this our guiding principle. We are very well aware that there is no such thing as the unique Black Experience. We are plural and embrace this shared identity. Solidarity and unity are not about agreeing all the time. Conflicts and disagreement are part of any and every community. Community is a plurality of individuals and therefore, also of politics. We find that the dichotomies created in the recent article in the Gazette are problematic and exclude a number of black communities and community members from consideration. We reject assertions of entitlement that suggest that anyone has the right to arrogate themselves the authority to speak on behalf of others, especially if it is pertaining to a community circle to which they do not belong as in the case of the Gazette article.

Many of us have participated and worked in/with important organizations and have acquired, shared and continue to carry much knowledge along the way. We do not deny or dismiss the historical contributions and legacies of these organizations as they inform our own. We love grey hair. We respect our elders. Moreover some of the long-lasting organizations are still thriving, adapting to the needs of their neighbourhoods and communities alongside the new organizations set up by members of a  younger generation who may also choose to live and express their politics outside of the public gaze. If you do not see people in the media, it is not necessarily because they are not getting the work done. If people are not always in the streets it does not mean that they are not waging political struggles. When people choose not to use the mainstream media as their platform it does not mean that their actions do not speak loudly. It is a well known fact that, at present, the media in Quebec is failing in its responsibility to contribute adequate, meaningful and equitable representation of Black communities’ lives and struggles.

Beyond this article, beyond the current U.S. based movement, we, like many others, will continue to do what has been done for decades in this city, away from the spotlight, sometimes away from formal institutions,  one action at a time and one need at a time. Instead of posing ludicrous questions about whether Black lives matter in Montreal and where the movement might be in this city, we suggest it would be more fruitful to ask what various forms has and does Black activism take in Montreal?

We respectfully (ok maybe with a little cussin’ and a long tchiurrrrrpppp) ask what is the motive behind an attempt to speak in our name and write about Black communities in Montreal in ways that pit people, communities, and political work against each other?

We hereby reassert and recreate our circle of solidarity, in respect and honour!

Signed,

Pascale C. Annoual
rosalind hampton
Maguy Métellus
Brenda Paris
Désirée Rochat
Rafaëlle Roy
Maria Elena Stoodley

Signed in support by Montreal Black community workers:

Will Prosper
Stéphane Allix
Agnès Berthelot-Raffard
Marjorie Villefranche
Neil “Zibz Blackurrent” Guilding
Alain Saint-Victor
Nydia Dauphin
Kenny Thomas
Camiella M. Hay
Stella Jetté
Kama La Mackerel
Ricardo Gustave
Kym Dominique-Ferguson

 

Lettre d’un groupe intergénérationnel de membres de différentes communautés noires

Nous sommes un groupe de personnes montréalaises dont les origines, les histoires, les générations, les professions et les occupations diffèrent. Nous nous sommes rencontrées dans les tranchées, par le biais de notre travail et à travers les actions posées au sein de nos communautés respectives.

Nous écrivons ce texte en réaction à l’article paru récemment dans The Gazette, que nous jugeons contestable à bien des égards. Notre propos est d’attirer l’attention sur la diversité des expériences vécues au sein des communautés noires, de même que les diverses formes que prend l’activisme dans la cité. Nous savons que la réaction des membres des communautés noires face à l’oppression s’exprime  de différentes manières et parfois, seulement dans l’intimité. Les méthodes afro-américaines particulières d’organisation et d’activisme auxquelles fait référence l’article de la Gazette s’appuient notamment sur des individus charismatiques facilement identifiables ou sur des campagnes d’actions directes. En affirmant que l’activisme noir de notre ville est faible, peureux, frileux ou désuet parce que nos communautés ne reproduisent pas précisément ces méthodes, une journaliste risque d’effacer les actions quotidiennes à plus petite échelle posées par des membres des communautés noires, tant au sein d’organismes communautaires qu’en dehors de ce cadre.

Nous affirmons que l’utilisation d’un mouvement social étatsunien comme critère pour évaluer notre activisme local vise à faire abstraction du contexte politique et historique dans lequel les communautés noires se sont organisées ici depuis toujours. Cela revient à minimiser les ponts que nous avons réussi à construire et à maintenir,  malgré le fossé linguistique divisant nos communautés en de multiples solitudes. Cela revient également à ignorer les dfférents types d’activisme que les personnes noires pratiquent au Québec en tant qu’artistes, étudiant.e.s, éducateur.trice.s, auteur.e.s et autres travailleur.euse.s culturel.le.s et communautaires.

Tout en appuyant sans réserve le mouvement BlackLivesMatter aux États-Unis, nous considérons que l’utiliser comme un idéal de comparaison pour toutes les formes d’activisme noir renforce la notion de hierarchie entre les communautés noires des Amériques, hierarchie à laquelle nous refusons d’adhérer. Les manifestations et les conférences de presse sont des stratégies importantes de l’activisme socio-politique. Cependant le succès d’un mouvement social se définit également par le travail quotidien et inlassable de ceux qui en soutiennent, servent et construisent les fondations.

Nous avons un profond respect pour le travail des activistes afro-américains, et nos objectifs montréalais ne sont pas si différents des leurs. Ceci dit, en plus des États-Unis, nous puisons notre inspiration à d’autres sources également ; c’est ainsi que notre travail est enraciné dans plusieurs autres pays et communautés avec lesquels nous demeurons en constante connection. Nous ne trouvons pas que l’évaluation hierarchique entre les espaces, les types de travail, l’activisme et les communautés soit une démarche constructive.

Nous sommes aussi d’avis que le travail communautaire en tant qu’activisme peut s’appuyer sur un leadership partagé, où aucun individu n’est la référence, le visage ou la voix d’un mouvement, d’un organisme ou d’un collectif. Ceci est notre principe directeur. Nous savons que l’expérience du fait noir est multiforme. Nous sommes pluriel.le.s et endossons pleinement cette identité multiple et partagée. Être solidaires et uni.e.s ne signifie pas être en accord sur tout. Les conflits et les désaccords sont partie intégrante de toute communauté. Une communauté est une multiplicité d’individus, et par conséquent de points de vues et de positions. Nous trouvons problématiques les dichotomies créées par l’article de The Gazette. Elles excluent un nombre considérable de communautés noires ainsi que leurs membres. Nous rejetons toute suggestion d’autorité auto-proclamée qui permettrait à qui que ce soit de s’arroger le droit de parler au nom de n’importe qui, particulièrement au nom de communautés auxquelles elle n’appartient pas, et qu’elle ne connaît pas, comme le fait l’article de The Gazette.

Plusieurs d’entres nous avons travaillé au sein d’organismes importants ou avons collaboré avec eux. Nous y avons acquis et partagé des connaissances précieuses, qui nous servent encore. Nous ne saurions nier ni ignorer les contributions historiques ni l’héritage de ces organismes puisqu’ils inspirent nos actions. Nous aimons la sagesse de nos têtes chenues. Nous respectons nos aîné.e.s. Qui plus est, certains de ces organismes pionniers sont encore très dynamiques et ont su s’adapter aux besoins de leurs quartiers et communautés. Ils établissent des partenariats avec des organismes mis sur pied par des membres de générations cadettes qui ont peut-être choisi d’exprimer leurs convictions loin des regards. Si vous ne voyez pas ces personnes dans les médias, cela  ne signifie aucunement qu’elles ne travaillent pas. Si ces personnes ne protestent pas dans les rues, cela ne signifie pas qu’elles sont sans revendications politiques. Lorsque des gens choisissent de ne pas utiliser les médias de masse comme plateforme, cela ne signifie pas que leur voix n’est pas entendue. C’est un fait connu, les médias québécois échouent quant à leur responsabilité de contribuer adéquatement, de façon significative et équitable, à la représentation des vies et des luttes des communautés noires.

Au-delà de cet article, au-delà des mouvements sociaux contemporains basés aux États-Unis, nous, comme bien d’autres, allons poursuivre le travail en cours depuis des décennies dans notre ville, loin des projecteurs, parfois en dehors de cadres formels, une action à la fois et un besoin à la fois. Au lieu de poser des questions ridicules à propos de la valeur des vies noires à Montréal et où et comment le mouvement BLM pourrait être obséquieusement  imité ici, nous suggérons qu’il serait plus constructif de demander quelles sont les diverses façons dont l’activisme noir s’exprime à Montréal.

C’est avec respect (quoique, s’il faut tout dire, avec un ‘ti juron accompagné d’un tchiurrrrrpppp bien ressenti) que nous nous demandons  ce qui vous motive à vous aventurer à parler en notre nom.  Qu’est-ce qui peut bien vous inciter à écrire sur les communautés noires de Montréal d’une manière qui ne peut que dresser des personnes, des communautés, des luttes politiques, les unes contre les autres ?

Par la présente, nous réaffirmons et recréons notre cercle de solidarité. Honneur et respect!

Signé,

Pascale C. Annoual
rosalind hampton
Maguy Métellus
Brenda Paris
Désirée Rochat
Rafaëlle Roy
Maria Elena Stoodley

Signé avec l’appui de travailleurs.euses des communautés noires en Montréal:

Will Prosper
Stéphane Allix
Agnès Berthelot-Raffard
Marjorie Villefranche
Neil “Zibz Blackurrent” Guilding
Alain Saint-Victor
Nydia Dauphin
Kenny Thomas
Camiella M. Hay
Stella Jetté
Kama La Mackerel
Ricardo Gustave
Kym Dominique-Ferguson

Leave a Reply